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denied

So according to the Dog People at the animal shelter, no one that is out of the house for more than two hours at a time for the next ten months is allowed to adopt a puppy.  This therefore limits the population of puppy adopters to unemployed agoraphobics and bedbound invalids, but whatever.  We were counseled to adopt a "housebroken dog," which limits our shelter picks from about a hundred animals to one, an eight year old pit-bull named "Kronis" who, while house-trained, also looks as though he may have rabies. 

Let's be honest now.  How many dogs in shelters are actually housebroken?  Probably most of the time that people give up dogs to the shelter is because they're not housebroken.  Limiting us to a housebroken shelter dog is like limiting us to only buying mink coats at Old Navy.  Or something.

Starting mid-November, I'm going to have something like two and a half months off from work, so we'll go back to the shelter then and try our chances again.  Otherwise, I'm just going to say that I work from home.  Fucking Dog Nazis.  No, seriously though--I don't begrudge these people for doing their jobs, but girlfriend, please.  Not leave your dog unsupervised for more than two hours until the puppy is one year old?  Are we not allowed to
sleep
for more than two hour shifts, either?  I understand the mess inherent in a non-housebroken dog, but if we're aware that the animal will, in fact, have accidents, shouldn't it be our call whether or not we're willing to handle that?

Other than the debacle at the pound, things are going well.  We had dinner with Guillem, Brendan, and his lovely lady friend N. on Thursday, for which Brendan made a lovely apple pie and then, after taking it out of the oven, proceeded to accidentally drop the top half of it into the sink. (Oops.)  Well, the bottom tasted right nice anyway, and we cheered his efforts heartily.  Honestly, how many men actually decide to bake apple pies for company of their own volition?  That's good stuff.

On the homefront, this weekend was another fruitful unpacking period, where we pretty much got rid of the last of the boxes, arranged the office, and roughly sketched out the guest room.  Aah, domesticity. 

The problem with unpacking is that, once you start to make things neat and the room starts to look nice, you just keep thinking of things that you want to buy to make it even more nice.  Like framed prints for the walls.  Or new sheets for the guestroom bed.  Or new upholstery for the dining room chairs.  We're getting married in about half a year, so we're trying to hold off on any major purchases until we're deciding where and for what we're going to register, but it's a major act of willpower right now.  I really, really, really want to order this framed photo (I guess you could infer that I like it a lot), but right now, it's a little bit more of a luxury item than I'm willing to spring for.

Oh, one more residency application update:  I've gotten interviews from every program to which I applied, with the exception of one, which I'm still waiting on.  Fie on you, coy holdout program!  My first scheduled interview is on Halloween.  I'm aiming to have all of my interviews done by the end of November, and therefore be able to take all of December off to loaf around and do nothing.  All the more time to spend training our future dog, you see.


xo
Michelle
Sunday . October 13 . 2002 . 9:26pm
denied

So according to the Dog People at the animal shelter, no one that is out of the house for more than two hours at a time for the next ten months is allowed to adopt a puppy.  This therefore limits the population of puppy adopters to unemployed agoraphobics and bedbound invalids, but whatever.  We were counseled to adopt a "housebroken dog," which limits our shelter picks from about a hundred animals to one, an eight year old pit-bull named "Kronis" who, while house-trained, also looks as though he may have rabies. 

Let's be honest now.  How many dogs in shelters are actually housebroken?  Probably most of the time that people give up dogs to the shelter is because they're not housebroken.  Limiting us to a housebroken shelter dog is like limiting us to only buying mink coats at Old Navy.  Or something.

Starting mid-November, I'm going to have something like two and a half months off from work, so we'll go back to the shelter then and try our chances again.  Otherwise, I'm just going to say that I work from home.  Fucking Dog Nazis.  No, seriously though--I don't begrudge these people for doing their jobs, but girlfriend, please.  Not leave your dog unsupervised for more than two hours until the puppy is one year old?  Are we not allowed to
sleep
for more than two hour shifts, either?  I understand the mess inherent in a non-housebroken dog, but if we're aware that the animal will, in fact, have accidents, shouldn't it be our call whether or not we're willing to handle that?

Other than the debacle at the pound, things are going well.  We had dinner with Guillem, Brendan, and his lovely lady friend N. on Thursday, for which Brendan made a lovely apple pie and then, after taking it out of the oven, proceeded to accidentally drop the top half of it into the sink. (Oops.)  Well, the bottom tasted right nice anyway, and we cheered his efforts heartily.  Honestly, how many men actually decide to bake apple pies for company of their own volition?  That's good stuff.

On the homefront, this weekend was another fruitful unpacking period, where we pretty much got rid of the last of the boxes, arranged the office, and roughly sketched out the guest room.  Aah, domesticity. 

The problem with unpacking is that, once you start to make things neat and the room starts to look nice, you just keep thinking of things that you want to buy to make it even more nice.  Like framed prints for the walls.  Or new sheets for the guestroom bed.  Or new upholstery for the dining room chairs.  We're getting married in about half a year, so we're trying to hold off on any major purchases until we're deciding where and for what we're going to register, but it's a major act of willpower right now.  I really, really, really want to order this framed photo (I guess you could infer that I like it a lot), but right now, it's a little bit more of a luxury item than I'm willing to spring for.

Oh, one more residency application update:  I've gotten interviews from every program to which I applied, with the exception of one, which I'm still waiting on.  Fie on you, coy holdout program!  My first scheduled interview is on Halloween.  I'm aiming to have all of my interviews done by the end of November, and therefore be able to take all of December off to loaf around and do nothing.  All the more time to spend training our future dog, you see.


xo
Michelle